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Old 6th February 2005, 09:25 AM   #1
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Question Increasing punching speed and -power

What are some good drills for doing this? I do some boxing with dumbells once a week and pushups with a clap, could someone come up with a good program using these two excercises, how many sets, reps and so on?
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Last edited by freefightdave; 6th February 2005 at 11:24 AM.
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Old 6th February 2005, 10:43 PM   #2
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The key to getting speed is to teach your muscles to relax and be explosive. Relaxation you just need to work mentally and tell every muscle involved to relax. There's a lot of muscles involved in punching. Explosivity you train by standing completely still in front of the bag, going into that relaxed state, and from there throwing a straight right, for example. Exploding is difficult because it takes a lot of time to learn and you need to do it with the whole body.

I would get into fighting stance in front of my bag and then put a rectangle of tape around where my feet were. Everytime I went into relaxing+exploding excersises, I'd make damn sure I stood inside those boundaries. Really, the thing is to in your mind always try to throw yout techniques faster and faster. There's no physical excersises you can do that'll as a sideeffect make you a real quick puncher. Punching is the most important thing. Sets and reps are for these excersises not important. I'd explode a punch and then it'd take the time it take until I felt relaxed enough to explode the next time -- to try and punch explosively when you're not relaxed is teaching the body a wrong thing, in my opinion. The wait between punch 1 and 2 could be anything from seconds to minutes in my case. Once you get started and going with that, you'll get a better understanding of what's right for you in your training.

Sometimes those excersises are good after a tough workout. Do five 3 minute rounds on the heavy bag and in each round have a timed 30 second flurry where you go in close and give it your all. This should get your muscles pretty relaxed in the end.

Power is a lot about throwing it with enough bodyweight behind the punches. However, I've never found physical strength to be a disadvantage.

As a final note, speed is not as important as it is to set up your punches. :-)

Anyway, it's late, hope something made sense. LOL.
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Old 7th February 2005, 05:11 AM   #3
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Thanks for the good answer.
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Old 21st February 2005, 08:27 AM   #4
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its unfair how some people seem naturally gifted with the ability to punch obscenely hard. guys like igor, tyson, etc... i dont understand them.

i suppose a combination of physical strength and punching technique/speed is the answer. guys like coleman have a LOT of strength but dont hit that hard (in relation to guys like igor and cc) because their punches are slow and awkward.


also, could anyone tell me how lifting (bench press and so forth) affects punching? i read somewhere that it ruins your punching, and another source said it was beneficial, and quite frankly i dont know which to believe.
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Old 21st February 2005, 11:41 AM   #5
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Any fighter that does lifting shouldn't lift like bodybuilders do. That's basically it. A fighter should primarily do their lifts explosively. Like with squats, go down slowly and when you reverse to go up, you explode up quickly. IMO, benchpress won't ruin your punching as long as you do most of your lifts explosively and stretch well afterwards. You can't do that when you're maxing the weight because typically you don't have the strength, but you probably don't max any more frequently than every 2 weeks at most.

I'd say try that. See how your body responds. Everyone's different. There should, however, be no relation between getting stronger and punching weaker or the other way around.
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Old 21st February 2005, 11:42 AM   #6
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Just an addition, it might be necessary to lift non-explosively for a while in order to build a strong core and strong muscles that can take i.e. explosive squats.
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Old 9th October 2008, 10:33 PM   #7
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Some guys mentioned like Tyson and Crocop have (had) very strong legs. Also, their mechanics were perfect in punching.

Some great tips mentioned above. One simple thing I've been taught is to relax your punching hand right up until the point of impact. Yes it's Bruce Lee 101, but it works. Too often needlessly clenched up hands seize up your arms and cause for slower punches.
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Old 10th October 2008, 03:38 AM   #8
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Quote:
The key to getting speed is to teach your muscles to relax and be explosive.
There's not enough stress upon this key factor. If you contract the muscles on the chain as if their strength works separate, you will simply fragment the blow (it will not accelerate). If you are too relaxed, you will not accelerate either (you can't catch enough speed).
My experience proved in time that each fighter has to be individualized for training once he got the good basic habits. The feeling about "at which point speed and power coordinate optimally" is unique. Periodically, each fighter has to reshape/reset his basic routines.
An example: check at bag and then at padwork increasing speed then increasing power. Escalate in small steps. Then do the same and try to hit reacting to the target (at pads, obvious). At some point, you will have the feeling which dosage of speed vs. power is optimal for you.
There is another factor often neglected - focus not only on the "hit" but also on the "hit+go" trajectory. If your hit comes hard and explosive to the target, but the opposite motion is lacking control, your blow will put you offbalance and there will be two bad consequences: you land after the blow virtually defenseless, and your combination work will suck. There are a lot of examples of explosive fighters who were frustrated in the ring by movers who induced them to offbalance themselves by making miss. A couple of simple routines to check the balance after a hit is a) to double the hit (especially good for kicks). If the second hit lacks something, it is mostly due to an improper landing after the first hit b ) to have the padman make miss to a hit and ask you to continue with something else. If you are not able to flow after a miss, there's something wrong (it usually means you are overloading or lacking control at the impact).
Secondary lesson: conditioning the antagonists of the blow is as important as conditioning the agonist.
Just my 2 cents, good luck
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